leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

(via sriracha-lips)

bethrevis:

US Constitution, First Amendment: The right to assemble, to have free speech, to have freedom of the press.

Ferguson Police: Kicks out media and limits protestors to a “First Amendment Area”image

(via eye-you)

nymphet-girl-1997:

homeviewing:

Veneno para las hadas (Carlos Enrique Taboada, 1984)

ME
nymphet-girl-1997:

homeviewing:

Veneno para las hadas (Carlos Enrique Taboada, 1984)

ME

nymphet-girl-1997:

homeviewing:

Veneno para las hadas (Carlos Enrique Taboada, 1984)

ME

(via uglygirlsclub)


Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

Eyes as Big as Plates - Norway and Finland

blackcontemporaryart:

MwangiHutter
Neger Don’t Call Me, 2000
Video projection, 4 chairs with loudspeakers, 11:34 minutes (courtesy of The Heather and Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, DC)

(via uglygirlsclub)

blackpeopledoshittoo:

Man waving a Palestinian flag in Ferguson “because they supported St. Louis.”

Powerful.

(via thebluelip-blondie)

thinksquad:

Cops have been put on notice: Let the cameras roll.
Camera-shy cops across the city were reminded they can’t legally take action to stop someone from filming them while they’re on the beat, the Daily News has learned. The refresher was provided in a memo the chief of department’s office distributed to all police commands Wednesday.
“Members of the public are legally allowed to record police interactions,” the memo states. “Intentional interference such as blocking or obstructing cameras or ordering the person to cease constitutes censorship and also violates the First Amendment.”
Cops can take action if videographers and shutterbugs “interfere with police operations,” the memo notes.
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nypd-cops-told-memo-filmed-article-1.1898379
thinksquad:

Cops have been put on notice: Let the cameras roll.
Camera-shy cops across the city were reminded they can’t legally take action to stop someone from filming them while they’re on the beat, the Daily News has learned. The refresher was provided in a memo the chief of department’s office distributed to all police commands Wednesday.
“Members of the public are legally allowed to record police interactions,” the memo states. “Intentional interference such as blocking or obstructing cameras or ordering the person to cease constitutes censorship and also violates the First Amendment.”
Cops can take action if videographers and shutterbugs “interfere with police operations,” the memo notes.
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nypd-cops-told-memo-filmed-article-1.1898379

thinksquad:

Cops have been put on notice: Let the cameras roll.

Camera-shy cops across the city were reminded they can’t legally take action to stop someone from filming them while they’re on the beat, the Daily News has learned. The refresher was provided in a memo the chief of department’s office distributed to all police commands Wednesday.

“Members of the public are legally allowed to record police interactions,” the memo states. “Intentional interference such as blocking or obstructing cameras or ordering the person to cease constitutes censorship and also violates the First Amendment.”

Cops can take action if videographers and shutterbugs “interfere with police operations,” the memo notes.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nypd-cops-told-memo-filmed-article-1.1898379

(via nappynomad)

postracialcomments:

September 20, 2009: Ferguson Police Department

The officers got the wrong man, but charged him anyway—with getting his blood on their uniforms. How the Ferguson PD ran the town where Michael Brown was gunned down.
Police in Ferguson, Missouri, once charged a man with destruction of property for bleeding on their uniforms while four of them allegedly beat him.
“On and/or about the 20th day of Sept. 20, 2009 at or near 222 S. Florissant within the corporate limits of Ferguson, Missouri, the above named defendant did then and there unlawfully commit the offense of ‘property damage’ to wit did transfer blood to the uniform,” reads the charge sheet.
The address is the headquarters of the Ferguson Police Department, where a 52-year-old welder named Henry Davis was taken in the predawn hours on that date. He had been arrested for an outstanding warrant that proved to actually be for another man of the same surname, but a different middle name and Social Security number.
“I said, ‘I told you guys it wasn’t me,’” Davis later testified.
He recalled the booking officer saying, “We have a problem.”
“I told the police officers there that I didn’t do nothing, ‘Why is you guys doing this to me?’” Davis testified. “They said, ‘OK, just lay on the ground and put your hands behind your back.’”
Davis said he complied and that a female officer straddled and then handcuffed him. Two other officers crowded into the cell.
“They started hitting me,” he testified. “I was getting hit and I just covered up.”
“He ran in and kicked me in the head,” Davis recalled. “I almost passed out at that point… Paramedics came… They said it was too much blood, I had to go to the hospital.”
A patrol car took the bleeding Davis to a nearby emergency room. He refused treatment, demanding somebody first take his picture. 
“I wanted a witness and proof of what they done to me,” Davis said.
He was driven back to the jail, where he was held for several days before he posted $1,500 bond on four counts of “property damage.” Police Officer John Beaird had signed complaints swearing on pain of perjury that Davis had bled on his uniform and those of three fellow officer“ After Mr. Davis was detained, did you have any blood on you?” asked Davis’ lawyer, James Schottel.  
“No, sir,” Beaird replied.
Schottel showed Beaird a copy of the “property damage” complaint.
“Is that your signature as complainant?” the lawyer asked.
“It is, sir,” the cop said.
“And what do you allege that Mr. Davis did unlawfully in this one?” the lawyer asked.
“Transferred blood to my uniform while Davis was resisting,” the cop said.
“And didn’t I ask you earlier in this deposition if Mr. Davis got blood on your uniform?”
“You did, sir.”
“And didn’t you respond no?”
“Correct. I did.”


Source

postracialcomments:

September 20, 2009: Ferguson Police Department
The officers got the wrong man, but charged him anyway—with getting his blood on their uniforms. How the Ferguson PD ran the town where Michael Brown was gunned down.
Police in Ferguson, Missouri, once charged a man with destruction of property for bleeding on their uniforms while four of them allegedly beat him.
“On and/or about the 20th day of Sept. 20, 2009 at or near 222 S. Florissant within the corporate limits of Ferguson, Missouri, the above named defendant did then and there unlawfully commit the offense of ‘property damage’ to wit did transfer blood to the uniform,” reads the charge sheet.
The address is the headquarters of the Ferguson Police Department, where a 52-year-old welder named Henry Davis was taken in the predawn hours on that date. He had been arrested for an outstanding warrant that proved to actually be for another man of the same surname, but a different middle name and Social Security number.
“I said, ‘I told you guys it wasn’t me,’” Davis later testified.
He recalled the booking officer saying, “We have a problem.”
“I told the police officers there that I didn’t do nothing, ‘Why is you guys doing this to me?’” Davis testified. “They said, ‘OK, just lay on the ground and put your hands behind your back.’”
Davis said he complied and that a female officer straddled and then handcuffed him. Two other officers crowded into the cell.
“They started hitting me,” he testified. “I was getting hit and I just covered up.”
“He ran in and kicked me in the head,” Davis recalled. “I almost passed out at that point… Paramedics came… They said it was too much blood, I had to go to the hospital.”
A patrol car took the bleeding Davis to a nearby emergency room. He refused treatment, demanding somebody first take his picture. 
“I wanted a witness and proof of what they done to me,” Davis said.
He was driven back to the jail, where he was held for several days before he posted $1,500 bond on four counts of “property damage.” Police Officer John Beaird had signed complaints swearing on pain of perjury that Davis had bled on his uniform and those of three fellow officer“ After Mr. Davis was detained, did you have any blood on you?” asked Davis’ lawyer, James Schottel.  
“No, sir,” Beaird replied.
Schottel showed Beaird a copy of the “property damage” complaint.
“Is that your signature as complainant?” the lawyer asked.
“It is, sir,” the cop said.
“And what do you allege that Mr. Davis did unlawfully in this one?” the lawyer asked.
“Transferred blood to my uniform while Davis was resisting,” the cop said.
“And didn’t I ask you earlier in this deposition if Mr. Davis got blood on your uniform?”
“You did, sir.”
“And didn’t you respond no?”
“Correct. I did.”

Source

(via sludgemetalprincess)